Frequently Asked Questions

 

What is Portalis?

 

Portalis is the name of the joint venture developing the proposed $250 million Cape Hardy Stage 1 port project on the Eyre Peninsula, South Australia. Portalis brings together project partners Iron Road Limited, Eyre Peninsula Co-Operative Bulk Handling Limited (EPCBH) and Macquarie Capital, a division of Australian-headquartered Macquarie Group. 

 

Former South Australian premier and widely respected farming advocate the Hon Rob Kerin is the Project Chair for the Cape Hardy Stage 1 port project.

 

What is the Cape Hardy Stage 1 port project?

 

Located approximately seven kilometres south of Port Neill, Cape Hardy Stage 1 is a proposed $250 million multi-commodity, multi-user port, which is being developed by Portalis. Encompassing a 900-metre jetty, wharf and landholding of 1,100 hectares, the Cape Hardy port is a staged project and has planning approval to evolve into a multi-commodity and multi-user facility and will support the

region’s grain growers and open significant opportunities for a wide range of agricultural and resources producers.

 

What are the key advantages of the proposed Cape Hardy port?

 

This is a transformational project for the Eyre Peninsula. It will unlock a quarter of a billion dollars in investment and provides much-needed infrastructure for the area’s grain growers and other commodity producers while also delivering economic development and diversification opportunities for the Eyre Peninsula and South Australia.

 

Upon opening, the port will be a grain focussed export terminal aiming to ship at least 1.3 million tonnes per annum of wheat, barley and pulses from the Eyre Peninsula to global markets. With 1,100 hectares of land available to other industries and as the only deep-water port project able to be expanded to berth large capsize vessels, Cape Hardy will be uniquely placed to support the longer-term growth ambitions of the region’s grain producers and will also be a key enabler of the $2.4 billion Central Eyre Iron Project.

 

What potential environmental issues has Portalis considered?

 

No environmental issues of significance were uncovered during extensive studies as part of the EIS (Environmental Impact Study) for the broader Central Eyre Iron Project, including Cape Hardy. 

 

The port is in naturally deep water with no dredging required and the jetty and wharf structure has deliberately been located to avoid areas of seagrass. Approval under the Federal Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act (EPBC) is subject to manageable obligations relating to the southern right whale.

 

An application to amend the EIS to enable a staged development at Cape Hardy is being prepared.

 

Does the Eyre Peninsula need another port?

 

The Eyre Peninsula suffers from ageing infrastructure and growers face high costs and, in some cases, restrictions in getting their

grain to Port Lincoln, making them increasingly less competitive, particularly when compared with growers interstate and globally.

 

From day one of operating, Cape Hardy will provide competition to incumbent port operators, delivering better value for money for grain producers.

 

Cape Hardy has been planned from inception to evolve into a multi-commodity and multi-user facility and, as the only deep-water port project able to be expanded to berth large Capesize vessels, Cape Hardy will also be uniquely placed to support the longer-term growth ambitions of the region’s grain producers and will unlock significant opportunities for a wide range of agricultural and resources producers.

 

How many jobs will be supported during construction and ongoing?

Independent modelling indicates more than 400 direct and indirect jobs will be generated during construction. In terms of ongoing jobs, that will become clearer as the project develops but we expect it to be in the dozens.

Who will own Cape Hardy?

When the joint developers achieve final investment decision, Portalis will build, own and operate the port and associated grain materials handling facility for a period of at least 99 years. Importantly, growers, through membership of EPCBH will have significant ownership interest during construction, and the ability to increase ownership stake over time.

 

Who will pay for the port?

The joint developers are responsible for arranging financing of the port. The project has also received a Federal Government funding commitment of $25 million and is the only South Australian project currently listed on Infrastructure Australia’s Priority List. 

 

How do growers benefit from the project?

There are numerous short and long-term benefits for growers. Cape Hardy will encourage more competition, more choice and lower transport costs in getting growers product to market efficiently.

EPCBH ownership in the project will also provide substantial economic benefits to growers through member discounts for each grain of tonne delivered and distributions from the project.

How does the community benefit from the project?

 

This is a transformational project for the region that unlocks a quarter of a billion dollars in investment and provides significant opportunities through both the port and a broader industrial hub to develop and diversify the Eyre Peninsula economy and create

jobs.

 

To ensure we deliver a project that is aligned to the needs and interests of the local community, we have undertaken extensive consultation with landowners, local and regional communities, local community groups, Barngarla traditional owners, project specific committees, focus groups, industry and business and will continue to do so.

 

​The location of Cape Hardy will also result in the removal of 64,000 freight movements each year from the main streets of Port Lincoln, the Tod Highway and the Lincoln Highway.